Annual Conference

If You Missed Out on the 22nd LILRC Annual Conference on Libraries and the Future, Here’s a Recap!

This year’s Annual Conference on Libraries and the Future took place on October 24th and 25th, 2013 at Dowling College, Fortunoff Hall and it focused on the theme: Community by Design: Innovation & Transformation.

The conference kicked-off on Thursday night with hors d’oeuvres and a chance to network with collegues at the beautiful Fortunoff Hall at Dowling College.  Afterwards, attendees were ushered into the Ballroom for dinner, which was followed by dessert…although the real treat was our guest speaker Joe Raiola–solo performer, comedy writer, producer, director and speaker on first amendment issues.  Joe Raiola

In his performance of the Joy of Censorship, Joe explored the topic of censorship by providing a lively and engaging performance.  Early on, he displayed his artistic expression in the citing of his The Guns inspired by Edgar Allen Poe.  Joe continued with other examples of abuses of the First Amendment as well as a discussion of the history of MAD Magazine.  Did you know that in its early days MAD Magazine was converted from a comic book in the 1950s to a magazine in order to avoid censorship?  This is just one of the many insights provided during his humorous and thought-provoking performance.

Reflections on Labrary
Click image for presentation slides (PDF)

Joe Raiola was a hard act to follow, but our guest speakers for Friday’s full-day event pulled it off! With over 100 attendees in the audience, Jessica Yurkofsky, Librarian at the Harvard Library Innovation Lab, kicked-off the day with her presentation, “Reflections on LABRARY: A Harvard Library Experiment.”  In this talk, Jessica shared the story behind LABRARY, which was an experimental Pop-Up space put together by Harvard Graduate School of Design (GSD) students from the the Library Test Kitchen (http://www.librarytestkitchen.org), with the help of the Harvard Library and the Library Lab in December of 2012.  The LABRARY, which was located in an empty storefront in the middle of Harvard Square, was open to all and provided a space for collaberation, brainstorming, ingenuity and much more!  Here’s a look at some of the creative projects that came out of the LABRARY:

Interested in learning more?  Listen to a portion of Jessica’s presentation about the LABRARY:

Up next: Margaux DelGuidice and Rose Luna, Teacher Librarians and Library Journal 2013 Movers and Shakers. This dynamic-duo sees the key to the future of libraries in collaboration and community outreach.  They shared thier journey on how they’ve managed to reach out and build strong connections in their community, including engaging not only students, parents and school board members, but other libraries as well.

Rose and Marguax
Margaux DelGuidice and Rose Luna

Margaux and Rose also discussed the importance of advocacy and the new Common Core State Standards, which aim to “provide a consistent, clear understanding of what students are expected to learn, so teachers and parents know what they need to do to help them. The standards are designed to be robust and relevant to the real world, reflecting the knowledge and skills that our young people need for success in college and careers. With American students fully prepared for the future, our communities will be best positioned to compete successfully in the global economy.”  Many questions have arisen based on these new standards and Margaux and Rose shared the following video as a helpful resource for introducing the Common Core State Standards:

For additional information and a complete list of resources shared, attendees were encouraged to visit the Why Common Core Standards Matter Wiki online at: http://whycommoncorestandardsmatter.wikispaces.com/Common+Core+Resources.

Jessica Yurkofsky with attendees in the Inflatable Reading Room
Jessica Yurkofsky with attendees in the Inflatable Reading Room

Lunch was served following the two morning presentations and attendees had an opportunity to network, enjoy the grounds of Dowling College, and take a first-hand look at the Inflatable Reading Room that Jessica had discussed earlier in the day!

Bill Brewer Presentation
Click on image for presentation slides (PDF)

Last, but certainly not least, was our third speaker, Bill Brewer, Director of Client Relations from Designed Learning, Inc. who presented, “Six Conversations that Matter: Leadership Language in Action.”  Bill brought the conference to a closure with high energy and interactive activites for attendees in order to explore ways to build community within our own libraries by changing the way we think and interact.  Bill challenged the audience to think about leadership roles in a different way–defining what is considered traditional vs. alternative methods–much of which is based on the work of Peter Block in such works as The Answer to How is Yes and Community: The Structure of Belonging.  Some of the core questions attendees were asked to examine were:

What doubts do you have?
What’s the “no” you have been postponing?
What’s the “yes” you no longer mean?
What’s the forgiveness you have been withholding?
What’s the resentment I have that no one knows about?

The group was then given an alloted amount of time to share responses with another person they didn’t know very well.  It’s amazing to watch people in action as they share thoughts and ideas and through this exchange gain new insights and make new acquaintances.

Thanks to everyone who participated in this year’s event…we look forward to seeing you all next year!

Special thanks to:

Conference Sponsors:  H. W. Wilson Foundation, Nassau County Library Association, BALDESSARI & COSTER LLP,  Long Island University, Palmer School of Library & Information Science, AIP Publishing, CSEA-Long Island, Island Industrial Boilers, Kevin A. Seaman, Esq., Knockout Pest Control, Inc., National Center for Surburban Studies at Hofstra University, Regan Agency, Inc., NYSUT, SandPebble Builders, Inc., Suffolk County Library Association, Thermal Solutions, Inc., and United Public Service Employees Union.

The LILRC Annual Conference Committee, LILRC Board of Trustees, and Connie Litcher.

Dowling College, for hosting this years event.

workshop

Redesign Library Space: Meeting the Changing Community Needs

On Friday, June 1, 2012, the Shelter Rock Public Library Director, Andrea Meluskey and Farmingdale Public Library
Director, Deborah Podolski shared with us their vision of a modern, user friendly library and how they were able to
accomplish their goals of re-purposing and modernizing their library.

Library Profiles:

 

Shelter Rock Public Library
(http://www.srpl.org)

Population Served: 27,188
Square Footage: 23,787
Square Footage Per Capita: 0.88
Number of Staff: 36.22 FTE
Operating Expenditures: $3,077,027

 

 

 

 

Farmingdale Public Library
(http://www.farmingdalelibrary.org)

Population Served: 41,080
Square Footage: 60,000
Square Footage Per Capita: 1.46
Number of Staff: 37.5 FTE
Operating Expenditures: $3,711,507

Presentation Slides:
https://lilrc.files.wordpress.com/2012/07/farmingdalerenovation.pdf

 

Many thanks to our speakers for opening up their libraries and sharing their knowledge and experiences with the Long Island library community.  Special thanks to Beatty, Harvey, Coco Architects, LLP for support of this program.

To view photos from the event, please visit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/lilrc/sets/72157630054018032/.

workshop

"I Didn't Know the Census Bureau Did That!" Workshop Provides Tons of Resources

April 24, 2012-Participants gathered at the Farmingdale State College, Greenley Library, for a hands-on training session on the two main demographic programs; the 2010 Census and the American Community Survey.

After a quick introduction, participants explored the Census website to become familiar with the features available for locating statistics and other information resources.   One of the newest features is the Interactive Map, which allows you to explore data from the County Business Patterns program and the 2010 Census.  Another feature worth a look is QuickFacts, which provides quick, easy access to facts about people, business, and geography for all states and counties, and for cities and towns with more than 5,000 people.

Additional resources include:

The American FactFinder was also explored and sample searches were conducted with attendees.  Resources covered included how to choose summary levels from the Geographic Filter page, how to access ACS Demographic Profiles for census tracts, creating a Census Tract Reference Map, and much more.

Click for PDF version of Handout

Special thanks to guest speaker Rosemarie Fogerty, Information Services Specialist, U.S. Census Bureau, New York Regional Office  for providing the training.  If you have any Census related questions, contact the Census New York Regional Office at 212-584-3440 or visit: www.census.gov/regions/new_york.

Annual Conference

Highlights from the LILRC 20th Annual Conference on Libraries and the Future

by: Chris Kretz, Dowling College Library, LILRC Annual Conference Committee Chair

LILRC’s Annual Conference on Libraries and the Future reached a milestone last October: twenty years of bringing engaging and thought-provoking speakers to Long Island to discuss the challenges and opportunities looming just over the horizon.  This year’s conference, held at Dowling College on October 27th and 28th, opened with the theme Extinction is Not an Option: Ensuring OUR Future. And for two days, over a hundred attendees from all across the library spectrum were able to hear four speakers elaborating on that theme.

As with most years, the event started off with a Thursday night dinner at Dowling College, filled with fine food and good conversation.  The after dinner speaker was Charles Brownstein, Executive Director of the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund (CBLDF).  In a fascinating talk, he outlined the history of comic books in America, from their explosion onto newsstands in the 1930s to their rising popularity through the war years, to the outrage they inspired from psychologists and the US Congress in the 1950s. Charles detailed how comics eventually evolved to an accepted artistic medium that tackles all manner of issues, many meant for an adult audience. The CBLDF, founded in 1990, works to defend the first amendment rights of comics creators and retailers. They also aid librarians in dealing with challenges to comics in the collection. Charles’ presentation was a valuable lesson in what took place before the presence of comics on library shelves became common place.

The Conference moved into full swing on Friday morning with the first speaker, James G. Neal, Vice President for Information Services and University Librarian of Columbia College. In his talk, Virtuality-Virtuosity-Virtousness: Radicalizing the Library for Future, he documented the changing roles of the library and highlighted a number of trends effecting their development. Among other things, James called for radical collaboration between libraries and outside partners; whether they be corporate, cultural, state or national organizations. He also summed up the theme of the conference in one slide, asking: are libraries a phyletic species (evolving into something new) or a terminal species, marked for….well, termination.

The second speaker, Zeth Lietzau, picked up where James left off with his presentation, Evolving with Techology. Zeth is the Manager of the Web Information Services and Community Technology Center at the Denver Public Library. The first half of his talk went into detail on a study he had taken part in at the Library Research Service: U.S. Public Libraries and the Use of Web Technologies. In a data-rich presentation, he detailed public library uses of technologies ranging from social media to mobile platforms, revealing details about who were the early adopters, the level of staffing and expenditures involved, and more. He finished with a description of the Community Technology Center at the Denver Public Library where they provide patrons with a range of computer resources and training opportunities.

Eli Neiburger, Associate Director, IT and Production at the Ann Arbor District Library brought the day to a rousing conclusion with his talk: Libraries in this Century: What to do Now, What to do Later. Although laced with humor, he grounded the problem in reality. Comparing the circulating collection to outmoded technologies that once thrived (think CDs and ice houses), Eli encouraged libraries to look for new value. He reinforced the idea of developing collaborations and saw the greatest opportunities in focusing on what is unique in each community. As he concluded, “The 20th century library brought the world to its community. The 21st century library will bring its community to the world.”

LILRC’s Regional Digitization Program was also celebrating an anniversary (its tenth) at this year’s conference. Regional Archivist, Virginia Antonucci-Gibbons, presented an overview of the program and demonstrated the rich historical resources housed in the Long Island Memories collection. This collaborative project makes the materials from libraries and historical societies Island-wide available online.

The Conference concluded with the traditional poster session. Attendees were able to enjoy dessert while talking with Mercedes Youman (pictured below) as she presented her research into Information Seeking Behaviors of Nurses Using ASHR in Schools and Health Informatics and Information Seeking Behavior of Health Care Practitioners.

Conference Sponsors: Baldessari & Coster LLP, EBSCO Publishing, EnvisionWare, Gale Cengage Learning, Long Island University, Palmer School of Library & Information Science, Nassau County Library Association, and the Suffolk County Library Association.

Visit the the LILRC 21st Annual Conference post at: http://blog.lilrc.org/ce/2011/11/15/20thannconf/ for additional conference materials including speaker presentations, audio and more.

 

Annual Conference

20th Annual Conference on Libraries and the Future

Extinction is Not an Option: Ensuring OUR Future

This year’s LILRC 20th Annual Conference on Libraries on the Future focused on the theme: Extinction is Not an Option: Ensuring OUR Future.

Thursday night’s guest speaker was Charles Brownstein, Executive Director, Comic Book Legal Defense Fund, who discussed the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund (CBLDF) among many other issues relating to comic books.

Click for PDF version of Presentation Slides

Charles Brownstein – Comic Book Legal Defense Fund

Attendees returned on Friday morning, for the full-day conference programs.  James G. Neal, Vice President for Information Services and University Librarian, Columbia University kicked off the conference with his presentation on Virtuality-Virtuosity-Virtousness: Radicalizing the Library for Future.

Click for PDF version of Presentation Slides

James G. Neal – Virtuality-Virtuosity-Virtousness

Following a short break, Zeth Lietzau, Manager, Web Information Services and Community Technology Center, Denver Public Library presented, Evolving with Technology: U.S. Public Libraries and the use of Web Technologies.

Click for PDF version of Presentation Slides

Zeth Lietzau – Evolving with Technology

Following lunch, our final speaker of the day took to the podium.  Eli Neiburger, Associate Director, IT and Production, Ann Arbor District Library presented Libraries in this Century: What to do Now, What to do Later.

Presentation slides coming soon

Eli Neiburger – Libraries in this Century

In addition to the Conference speakers, this year’s LILRC Annual Conference on Libraries and the Future also featured a presentation from LILRC Regional Archivist, Virginia Antonucci-Gibbons, who shared with attendees information on the LILRC Digitization Program, Long Island Memories.

Click for PDF version of Presentation Slides

 

The Conference concluded with a reception which featured the 10th Annual Poster Session participant, Mercedes Youman (pictured below), who shared her research in two posters entitled, Information Seeking Behaviors of Nurses Using ASHR in Schools and Health Informatics and Information Seeking Behavior of Health Care Practitioners.

Special thanks to:

Conference Sponsors:  BALDESSARI & COSTER LLP, EBSCO Publishing, EnvisionWare, Gale Cengage Learning, Long Island University, Palmer School of Library & Information Science, Nassau County Library Association, and the Suffolk County Library Association.

The LILRC Annual Conference Committee, LILRC Board of Trustees, and Connie Litcher.

Dowling College, for hosting this years event.

events

Register Now for the LILRC 20th Annual Conference on Libraries and the Future

October 27th & 28th, Dowling College

Extinction is Not an Option: Ensuring OUR Future

This year marks the 20th anniversary of the LILRC Annual Conference on Libraries and the Future. What a better time than now to take a look back at where we’ve been in order to explore where we’re going. Our first Annual Conference explored the theme of “Access to Information: Paradigms for the Future,” in which strategic visions of library services were explored. Thru the years, the LILRC Annual Conference has delved into timely topics including virtual reality, the library of the future, cyberstudents, einformation and e-libraries, access in the digital age, information commons, and much more.

As we reflect on the past and look to the future, the conference theme chosen for this year, “Extinction is Not an Option: Ensuring OUR Future” will mark 20 years of what hopes to be innovative and inspiring speakers, an engaging learning experience, and an opportunity to network with colleagues. And so, we would invite you to mark your calendars and take advantage of early bird rates for registration.

We’ll kick off Thursday night with a guest speaker from the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund and follow-up on Friday with three distinguished speakers including:

James G. Neal, Vice President for Information Services and University Librarian, Columbia University

▪ Eli Neiburger, Associate Director, IT and Production, Ann Arbor District Library

▪ Michael Porter, Community Product Manager, WebJunction, OCLC

We look forward to seeing many of you on October 27th & 28th, at DowlingCollege, Fortunoff Hall.

REGISTER NOW FOR EARLY BIRD RATES

(Click Image for PDF version)

workshop

LILRC Continuing Education Brochure July-December 2011 Now Available

The July-December 2011 LILRC sponsored continuing education programs are now available in an electronic version of the brochure here (in PDF format).  Please look for the printed version, which will be mailed very soon.

Guest speakers include:

  • Nicole Engard, Director of Open Source Education at ByWater Solutions
  • Cindy Stark, Associate Librarian, New York State Library.  Cindy Stark has worked at the New York State Library for over 20 years. She is currently the associate librarian in charge of interlibrary loan, document delivery, and acquisitions. The State Library uses ILLiad software to process interlibrary loan requests and belongs to IDS, a resource-sharing cooperative within New York State.
  • Lisa Carlucci Thomas, Digital Services Librarian, Southern Connecticut State University. Lisa Carlucci Thomas is an experienced manager and librarian known for her leadership and innovation in academic libraries and for her research on mobile devices & ebooks. Lisa is Digital Services Librarian at Southern Connecticut State University, where she is responsible for exploring, developing, and coordinating library technologies, systems, and digital initiatives. Lisa previously worked at the Yale University Library in the areas of digital collections, e-resource management, archives, reference, and access services. Lisa was named a 2010 Library Journal Mover & Shaker and was recognized by the American Library Association as a 2009 Emerging Leader.
  • Blake Carver, Owner, LISHost.org

Be sure to visit the LILRC Continuing Education Calendar online at http://lilrc.org/calendars/cont_edcalendar.php for additional information on upcoming workshops.

workshop

Mobile Literacy: Skills for Today’s Information Environment

Tuesday, February 15, 2011–Over 50 librarians from multi-type libraries gathered at the Plainview-Old Bethpage Public Library for Joe Murphy’s presentation, Mobile Literacy: Skills for Today’s Information Environment, which discussed how mobile devices are becoming a crucial part of the information experience, extending the need for information fluency into the mobile technology landscape.

PRESENTATION SLIDES:

Special thanks to the Plainview-Old Bethpage Public Library for hosting this event, Joe Murphy, and all who attended and contributed to the conversation.

Uncategorized

Mobile Literacy: Skills for Today's Information Environment

Tuesday, February 15, 2011–Over 50 librarians from multi-type libraries gathered at the Plainview-Old Bethpage Public Library for Joe Murphy’s presentation, Mobile Literacy: Skills for Today’s Information Environment, which discussed how mobile devices are becoming a crucial part of the information experience, extending the need for information fluency into the mobile technology landscape.

PRESENTATION SLIDES:

Special thanks to the Plainview-Old Bethpage Public Library for hosting this event, Joe Murphy, and all who attended and contributed to the conversation.

Uncategorized

Critical Strategies for Implementing and Managing Organizational Change–March 28th

Libraries are all too familiar with the critical importance of undergoing fundamental change, including effectively responding to rapidly evolving technologies, greater external competition, fiscal instability, and/or shifting functional needs among library patrons. In order to react strategically and proactively to these developments, libraries must be agile, flexible, and adaptable.

Join LILRC on Monday, March 28, 2011 from 9:30AM-3:30PM at the Brentwood Public Library for a day-long workshop which provides a framework for facilitating, enabling, and sustaining organizational change.  In addition to an introduction to organizational change theory, an applied approach to understanding and managing change will be taken. Participants will work in large and small groups with the end goal of designing an action plan for implementing a change scenario.

Emphasis will be placed on:

  • Examining one’s own reaction to change
  • Cultivating an awareness of others reactions to change through a study of the various behavioral stages that people experience in light of organizational change
  • Identifying key stakeholders and change agents within one’s organization
  • Developing effective tools, including the necessary communication skills to enable staff to understand, accept, and embrace change
  • Designing a metric for charting the progress of change

http://vivo.cornell.edu/individual/vivo/individual22044PRESENTED BY:

Deb Schmidle
Director
Research and Learning Services Olin/Uris Libraries, Cornell University

CLICK HERE FOR REGISTRATION FORM*

*Registration fee includes morning coffee and lunch


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